Review of The Night Butterflies by Sara Litchfield

Once in a great while, a book comes along that impacts your life, and you know that you will forever cherish it.

In a world saturated by Hunger Games clones, The Night Butterflies is a refreshing, intelligent, well written alternative to the pseudo-dystopian novels that currently fill the shelves. This is no teenage angsty love triangle story. The characters in this novel aren’t complaining that their freedom or rights have been taken from them — they are, instead, stripped of their very humanity. In a post-war world where the very air is poison, Men and Women are separated, as a mysterious Leader and his circle of Men seek to develop medicine to keep everyone alive, but also, that thing that is crucial for a species to continue — healthy procreation.
This is where they have gone wrong — as wrong as possible — and the Mothers live in fear of their cruel, compassionless, inhumane children.
But suddenly, something begins to change for a couple of the characters, and a ray of hope begins to shine. Some of the children appear to be different, and some of the Mothers appear to be waking up from the drug induced stupors they usually stay in.

Lichfield uses multiple narrators, each with unique voices, even incorporating a sort of raw patois for one of the narrators, a young man who has not learned how to speak correctly. This was an inspired choice of storytelling method, giving the reader multiple points of view, and glimpses into the thoughts, fears, and motivations of each character.

One of my favourite novels of all time is Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, along with Wyndham’s Midwich Cuckoos, Moore’s V for Vendetta and Atwood’s Handmaid’s Tale. Sara Lichfield’s The Night Butterflies handles the topic of degradation and fear, and a society that has forgotten how to be human with equal skill and maturity. The rediscovery of the joys of connection with other human beings that happens with her characters is just as powerful as, for instance, Guy Montag’s awakening in Fahrenheit 451.

She is a truly gifted writer, and I will be adding this book to my list of books I read every year or so just to remind me why I read and why I write. To try — to keep trying — to create something as beautiful and inspiring as this.

Buy it here. Give it to a friend. Read this book.

Thank you, Sara, for this wonderful book.

 

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5 responses to “Review of The Night Butterflies by Sara Litchfield

  1. This sounds fantastic! What a review and recommendation. Sara couldn’t received a finer endorsement. I’ll be buying this for myself for Christmas today…..thank you.

    • It would also be a perfect book for a teenager to read instead of, say, all of the very formulaic franchise novels that are out there right now (i’m looking at you, Divergent, etc). Her characters demand your sympathy and empathy, they are just cookie cutter characters that you just insert yourself into. (i’m looking at you twilight and 50 shades of gray)

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